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Centennial Collectable Commemorative  Coins
For Sale Now at Town Hall...

   
                                                                                                                                                                             (photos by David Craig)

      June 30, 2009 - by Bob Walter: The Eatonville Centennial commemorative coins have been minted, and arrived in town Monday afternoon. The impressive coins are now available for purchase at the Town Hall, 201 Center Street West. There are four versions: a "bright" bronze (shown), an "antique" bronze, a silver (one troy ounce), and a silver with gold overlay. The last ones will be picked up later this week. The bronze versions are priced at $10 each, the silver $30 and the silver with gold, $40. The coins will be kept at Town Hall in the safe.
     Each coin is numbered and is encased in a plastic sleeve for protection. Buyers will be given a receipt with their name and coin number. These coins are exquisitely detailed and will make a beautiful keepsakes and gifts. They were designed by Eatonville's David Craig owner of Four Winds Studio & Art Gallery located at 127 Washington Avenue North. Mayor Tom Smallwood worked with Northwest Territorial Mint in Auburn to get the coins created. Get yours before they are gone, and help support Eatonville's grand, 100-year celebration!
    The mayor, David Craig, Nancy Iams and Dixie Walter, members of the Centennial Committee toured the mint Monday and picked up the coins. Mayor Smallwood had the privilege of striking the coin shown above. The true color of the coin is a brilliant, glowing, golden shade. Lighting at the mint made it difficult to capture the actual color.

A Brief Description of a Brief Video...

      You can experience a tour of mint at  Centennial Commemorative Coins June 29, 2009. The mint employees about 200 people in Auburn. You can watch one member of the staff lifting red hot silver weighing 35 pounds and take the cylinder to a machine where it is quickly turned into a narrow strip. Another employee dips coins in a solution which "antiques" the product.
     Watch Smallwood stamp a coin which now belongs to him, coin creator David Craig and Nancy Iams thrilled by a first look at the newly stamped coin, a machine full of what look like silver ball bearings smooths the coin blanks and Jack, Mike Boyle, plant supervisor and Smallwood admiring the bright bronze coin.
      See more still photos of the day at the mint and larger details of the Centennial Coin below.

 

Centennial Coins - Behind the Scenes
Photos by David Craig...

     Detail of coin's face depicting T. C. Van Eaton, town founder and Soo-Too-Lick (Indian Henry) overlooking Mount Rainier and the abundant forests of the area. Soo-Too-Lick befriended Van Eaton who was determined to create a community. Soo-Too-Lick's tribe made their village on the Mashell Meadow and knew the land well. When Van Eaton told of his plans for a town the affable Indian suggested the site where the town stands because it didn't get a lot of snow, game was plentiful and the Mashell River ran through it. Soo-Too-Lick remains much of a mystery - he wouldn't allow his photo to be taken and no one is quite sure which tribe he belonged to.
    The coins, like the Centennial logo, were designed by local artist David Craig.

 

Detail of Flip Side...

     The flip side illustrates the sun rising behind Mount Rainier, the most famous landmark seen from Eatonville and the Mashell River which remains the sole source of water for Eatonville. On the left is a small cabin representing the first home in Eatonville, the Van Eaton log cabin and the old wigwam burner an icon of the booming lumber industry of the past. The burner crumpled to the ground in a heap after a windstorm in 2006. The iconic monster was the only memory of the huge lumber mill which closed in the mid-1950s. Today all that remains of that era is the mill pond.
 

Red Hot Silver...

     David Craig, Mayor Tom Smallwood, Nancy Iams and I were given an extensive tour of the Northwest Territorial Mint in Auburn. The mint is the only privately owned mint in the U.S. with five locations across the nation. For more information please see Custom Minting - Military Challenge Coins - Northwest Territorial Mint.
    Above: Inside the white "box" is a 35 pound cylinder of silver being heated in one minute 35 seconds and immediately taken
to a machine that makes it into a long, narrow strip of silver which looks like a mirror, this process also takes moments. To the right are silver cylinders waiting their turn in the hot box. The silver heats from the center out. This process is repeated over and over again daily. (photo by Dixie A. Walter)
 

Mayor and Craftsman...

     Mayor Smallwood pushed the button that stamps blank coins with the design. Here Jack and Smallwood marvel at the coin the mayor had just struck.

 

Admiring His Work...

     Smallwood finally holds in his hand the Centennial Coin he has dreamed about for years. This coin is the bright bronze version. There are also bronze, silver, antique bronze and gold/silver coins available for sale.

 

Happy Mayor...

     Mayor Smallwood smiles in delight looking at the fruition of his vision of the Centennial Coin.

 

More Admiring Eyes...

     Jack, Mike Boyle, plant supervisor and our tour guide discuss the beautiful coin.

 

Learning About Dies...

     The Eatonville group, sans David Craig who was photos, learn about dies from Mike. This room was lined with drawers filled with dies of various sizes and weighing tons. The mint keeps all the dies they produce.

 

Detail of a Die Drawer...

     One hundred of these smaller dies fit in one drawer, there are drawer after drawer of small dies and large one.

 

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